Chino

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION FOR MEN IS LOCATED IN CHINO, CA,
HOUSING 3,627 PEOPLE.

Since March 2020, there have been 1,502 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including 27 deaths, at this facility.

Stories from Chino

12/20
I want to scream
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I want to scream

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino.

I want to scream at the idiocy of the state paying for addicts in the immediate vicinity who steal chemicals from the clinic, mix their own batch, and inject themselves and others in the neck, arm or leg three to four times a day at taxpayer expense, practicing medicine without a license, and destruction of state property themselves, or the inmate workers paid to make the prison wine to sell where neighbors throw up in my living area, start fights, or play their music loud. It gets worse in the name of rehabilitation.

When asked to lower the filth, a malicious confrontation takes place defining elder abuse. It takes eight taxpayers to support each one of these idiots, some getting paroled in a month or two to a neighborhood near you. With all of this in front of me, why must I wear a mask over my mouth when the C-virus enters through the eye ducts?

The insurance from the clinic of the illegally-used chemicals is far more damaging than minor respiratory distress. When I brought this up to mental health, I was told that’s the way things work here. Remove the word ‘rehabilitation’ from the agency title, who is receiving federal funds to manage this circus. I would love to teach HVAC, copy machine repair, or beginner’s electronics as I have in the past, but there’s no room for that nonsense.

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

I’m at the CDCR facility in Chino, level two, senior yard, and I understand you are interested in first-hand data during the C-virus modification of programs. I am 67, Air Force veteran in very good health since this started last year.

We live in long four upper/lower beds three to five feet apart on the sides. The outer rows of 10 to 12 beds have screened windows that open to the outside. Shortly after the pandemic, orders were sent down to take every third bed out of service, the logic of which doesn’t play out due to our proximity standing in lines for chow, utilizing the restroom/showers located midway between the 50 bed groups.

If you Google Earth 14901 S. Central Ave, Chino, our eight dorm layout can be seen with a ‘tent city’ of 12 eight-man tents in the center with portable AC/heating units, shower trailers and restrooms for those who tested positive in the last nine months, but mostly not showing any symptoms.

There are a few related topics I would like to include briefly. If additional information is desired, please send a note.

The isolation issue has been frustrating. While every third bed was taken out of service, the wall-mounted 48” oscillating fans at each end of the dorm room during the warmer months would blow coughs and sneezes half way down the dorm, from either end. In addition to that, these buildings from the 40s house inmates who are taking ‘hot meds,’ which makes them sensitive to warmer temperatures.

The rooftop exhaust fan designed to remove the radiated heat from the dorm has been non-operational since February. We went through three record heat waves this past summer. When it’s 120 outside, it’s 115 in here. And with 75 bodies on each side, the heat lasts into the evening with no negative or positive pressure.

I’m certified since 1974 in commercial HVAC. When I sent a friendly informal letter to the AW of operations, who I spoke with previously, the letter was intercepted. I was called in front of the Captain who made it clear I should go through the chain of command for work orders, which a survey will reveal do not get generated.

When this ‘crisis’ first got underway, groups of five to 20 people would be called all of a sudden to move to another building, out to the tents, or to another yard. When this happens, a loss of acquired property takes place. Social interactions are broken up like musicians, educational mentors, craft projects, and of course the addicts and their suppliers. The stress of sudden movement, unnecessary loss of property, social reintegration in new areas creates cortisol in older people which diminishes the immune system, the very function the objective is to protect. A lot of arbitrary moves and money spending took place.

The company testing the swabs, Quest Labs, is known for false positives. My ‘bunkie’ and assistant for the repair shop was moved to the tents in March. Neither of us has displayed any symptoms. He gets air conditioning, I get 115 degrees.

Ironically, the heat med inmates remain in the building, outside of ASHRA 64 building codes. When the rooftop exhaust fan was fixed last December, the hot-shot worker put a motor in two to three times the RPM rating. When it started up, the pulley would squeal on the belt. The motor would overheat due to the torque mismatch, and shut down after 10 to 15 minutes to cool off. Then it would happen all over again, all night long, over the sleeping area. The excessive speed finally destroyed the turbine bearings and it locked up.

That was last April. Grainger industrial supply delivers in 48 hours. I’ve offered to help. No response. Now with the cool weather, the windows get closed. The farts and the coughs and spent air are there to greet us in the morning.

I listen to science shows at night on the radio. I understand zinc, vitamin C and D help boost the immune system. It took me a couple months to get the cheap zinc from an outside vendor. Why was that never issued as a preventative?

The ultraviolet lamps that kill the C-virus in three minutes have all burned out, 24 of them, the last one in May. They also provide a soft night illumination for our older clientele trying to walk between the beds to the bathroom late at night.

This facility has a ‘mini-yard’ off of each dorm. A 50 x 1000 foot park-like setting with walking trails, a few benches, and tables to get outside for fresh air. We are fortunate to have that. The 90-day time credit was appreciated last June, and the extra vendor package.

I suggested the Zoom-style computer visits with family last July, and the system is just now getting installed for 30 minutes of screen time with family members. I developed a process awhile back where the experience could easily be in 3-D without the need for special glasses or screens. I gave a demo at the San Quentin TV production studio while there.

I want to scream at the idiocy of the state paying for addicts in the immediate vicinity who steal chemicals from the clinic, mix their own batch, and inject themselves and others in the neck, arm or leg three to four times a day at taxpayer expense, practicing medicine without a license, and destruction of state property themselves, or the inmate workers paid to make the prison wine to sell where neighbors throw up in my living area, start fights, or play their music loud. It gets worse in the name of rehabilitation.

When asked to lower the filth, a malicious confrontation takes place defining elder abuse. It takes eight taxpayers to support each one of these idiots, some getting paroled in a month or two to a neighborhood near you. With all of this in front of me, why must I wear a mask over my mouth when the C-virus enters through the eye ducts?

The insurance from the clinic of the illegally-used chemicals is far more damaging than minor respiratory distress. When I brought this up to mental health, I was told that’s the way things work here. Remove the word ‘rehabilitation’ from the agency title, who is receiving federal funds to manage this circus. I would love to teach HVAC, copy machine repair, or beginner’s electronics as I have in the past, but there’s no room for that nonsense.

Who do I see for lawful release from custody?

My father was a civil attorney. As a technician, I am trained to look for broken parts in a circuit. I received formal returns from various agencies, state and federal, on my trial that:

(1) The wiretaped evidence used in my trial is illegal, unauthorized, and voids the conviction.

(2) The absence of calendar dates on the counts voids my conviction. 6th United States constitutional amendment, notice and double jeopardy.

(3) The California Secretary of State returned that the prosecutor in Orange County case relied on actual fraud, manufactured evidence, and lacked probable cause. Trial void. I have all the above documents.

I presented all this to the Federal District Court. The respondent was summoned to appear and did not, four times. I was issued a discharge order. I filed for a writ of execution for release from custody. It was denied stating that because of my address, that it is assumed I owe restitution. I do not.

CDCR states zero balance owed on three appeals. Records staff here states it’s not their job, despite the Haygood v. Younger decision. If I sit and do nothing at this point, mid-2022 is my CDCR outdate. Holding a senior over 65 without authorization is a felony which I’ve proven with evidentiary backing.

The wiretap laws violated by the prosecutor award me $200 a day from 1993, plus attorney fees awarded to prosecute a claim, plus income lost from my active technical trades. Any counsel interested?

In closing, my engineer roommate and I, while researching the effects of different lighting frequencies and their influence on behavior modification, stumbled upon a chain reaction of events. Briefly, we had a seven color chart on our table late one night, reviewing the data. Tired, we shut off our overhead room light.

The orange security light from the next building shown across the chart and drastically changed the colors. Our interest peaked. We deciphered how this influence of a single frequency of night illumination would have on youth growing up under its influence night after night, on the street, in schools, in public parks.

We assembled a detailed report on our findings and it was subsequently published in two separate science research journals. It includes data from G.E. Lighting, and the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, and other reference footnotes.

We discovered the foundational cause for gangs and violence in our cities. After locals read the report, they tell me it makes too much sense. Then when you watch the news about officers or kids getting shot or attacked, the evidence is in plain sight.

I have developed a simple municipal cure for gang formation, territorial fights and killings, elder abuse, for application in cities as Los Angeles, Detroit, New York, or countries as Iraq and Iran. The report explains why.

With the absence of internet access, phone books, or outgoing calls without a pre-paid account, I can’t do anything about promoting this cure sitting here watching reruns of Green Acres. It’s very frustrating. CDCR is spending lots of money on isolating inmates, yet I can’t leave this mess with a federal discharge order, embossed and signed by a federal judge, in hand.

A neighbor I’m helping with a legal petition recently received valid confirmation that in fact his nephew raped his three pre-teen daughters while he was away at work, and the nephew threatened the three girls with great bodily injury if they told, to put the father out of the picture for continued access to them.

Well, six years later, after confiding in the family pastor about the miscarriages of justice, have produced signed declarations the father is, in fact, innocent of any wrong doing. The interrogation errors would take another page, his no contest plea was forced under duress clearly.

Staff here with a duty to act under Title 15, CCR, 3076, state it’s not their job. I have multiple types of petitions in the court of jurisdiction presently. How does he get away from this petri dish of coronavirus and back to his family? No tattoos, no drug or alcohol abuse, no priors, no harsh language, and a fine musician.

Thank you for your review of the above points. Sorry for the length. I’ve produced 18 screenplays and the words start to build up. I hope they made sense. Statements made above are sworn to be true and correct this 30th day November, 2020, at Chino, California, by the signature below. Further info on request, if needed. I just hope you get this. Take care.

12/20
Concerns and changes
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Concerns and changes

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino.

Ever since the spread of the coronavirus started in this prison there were many concerns and changes. The virus affected correctional officers, staff members, and prisoners. More than 300 who are 65 and older have health problems were transferred to other prisons. San Quentin is one of the prison that many were shipped to, and the numbers of COVID-19 there increased after, so the transferring had to be stopped to prevent further problems.

During the commotion, tents and bathroom and showers were being put up outside, in the big yard, where we do our workout and exercises. I was definitely worried when I saw the nine tents in the yard. It made me wondered if I happened to move and had to live in a tent, out of being in a single-man cell that I’m so used to live in. I’m worried I wouldn’t get to move back to house in a cell again. Not that the thought of me catching the virus somehow have haunted me a little bit. I wouldn’t want to die in prison, like 20 something prisoners who have been misfortune by the outbreak.

The pandemic isn’t over yet. My building is still on quarantine as of right now, for the third time, and this time it’s longer the last two because one person tested positive and another also tested positive right before the two weeks of quarantine ends.

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Greetings UCI Student,

First and foremost, I hope you’re keeping safe and remaining healthy. We’ll get through this hard time together. I’m in a good solitary confinement, in a minimum-security level yard, it’s not so bad. I’m happy to received your letter. Wow! UCI student, cool!!!

Ever since the spread of the coronavirus started in this prison there were many concerns and changes. The virus affected correctional officers, staff members, and prisoners. More than 300 who are 65 and older have health problems were transferred to other prisons. San Quentin is one of the prison that many were shipped to, and the numbers of COVID-19 there increased after, so the transferring had to be stopped to prevent further problems.

During the commotion, tents and bathroom and showers were being put up outside, in the big yard, where we do our workout and exercises. I was definitely worried when I saw the nine tents in the yard. It made me wondered if I happened to move and had to live in a tent, out of being in a single-man cell that I’m so used to live in. I’m worried I wouldn’t get to move back to house in a cell again. Not that the thought of me catching the virus somehow have haunted me a little bit. I wouldn’t want to die in prison, like 20 something prisoners who have been misfortune by the outbreak.

The pandemic isn’t over yet. My building is still on quarantine as of right now, for the third time, and this time it’s longer the last two because one person tested positive and another also tested positive right before the two weeks of quarantine ends. I hope this is the last. I missed working and being outside of this building for several hours doing something. I’m lucky to stay disciplined of working out, exercising, and how convenient it is that my building has a mini yard for me to run (I love running), 30 to 54 laps – about three to five miles, every morning at 9. Running keeps my body, mind, and spirit healthy, COVID proof.

Quite a few options I have in my cell. I can read – Take Me With You, by Catherine Ryan Hyde – a very good book, I can watch TV, or I can study my courses for business – my plan is to own a small business of an animal shelter in the future. You wouldn’t believe if I tell you that there are cats living in front of my building, yes, they are very loving adorable creatures God created, and I’m weak when I see them, or even think of them, so I feed them with canned goods – tunas and chickens, I bought at the store. Listening to music, radio, having coffee with donuts early morning after I rised from a good night sleep, keeps my inner strengths well managed.

As religion is a part of my life, having such wonderful and interesting people who have been incarcerated for more than a decade is a blessing; especially during the pandemic and the holidays season. Christian brothers would be among the group of people I mostly associate here in the building. I feel trusted and together and we make each other stronger in difficult times. These brothers, including myself, had put ourselves here, but over the years of doing time, we just realized that the life we once lived – robbery, stealing, dealing, even killing – isn’t helping us out at all. So we did what’s right for us and for our family back home who have been loyal and waiting for us to come back home. We turned to God.

Mom is the most important person of my life. Whenever I got a chance, I give her a call to make sure she’s ok at home. Talking to her on the phone and knowing that she’s safe and alive makes me feel strong and comforted. She and my three sisters are relieved about my life living in a good environment, and they know I handled things well.

I wish you the best in school and in pursuing your dreams. I hope my little true story inspired you. May you and your loved ones enjoy the holiday season together. Merry Christmas and have a happy new year. Please stay safe. Take care. God bless you!

Sincerely.

12/20
We’re scared
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We’re scared

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Chino.

Caller: The yard that I was on, A yard, the COVID cases were going crazy. And they didn’t know what to do with people.

So they were just moving people trying to create positive buildings and say “well half the building’s positive at the building’s not.” Problem is everybody shares a communal bathroom and there’s only one bathroom with, you know, six toilets or eight toilets and nine sinks. Everybody has to use the same bathroom.

So how do you put, you know, 75 negative people with 75 positive people and not expect the negative people not to get sick? Not gonna happen. And it just continued to grow.

And then they started shipping people out of this facility up to San Quentin and Avenal. And then of course, the explosion happened at San Quentin with cases from the people that they sent here. It was just nothing but a series of moving people around.

Trying whatever, like they just had no clue what they were doing. At this point, they’re not doing so much of the moving but we do have 14 tents sitting in the middle of our yard. On a couple of key- on one occasion, we had a Santa Ana windstorm and many of those tents blew away.

So they had to evacuate the people from those tents. And they got sent to another yard. Well they had to rebuild the tent city because the tents had actually literally blown away.

So right now, they test us every week. This side of the yard that I’m on, I’m on the west side, we get tested every Tuesday. The four buildings over here and the tent city get tested every Tuesday, so we were tested today.

We’ve all been on quarantine for the last few weeks. We’ve had a few cases- onesies twosies here and there. But for the most part, as of right now, it’s pretty quiet.

As far as cases go, we do have staff members that have started popping up sick, and two COs out in the tent city area within the last week came up sick. Supposedly our captain came up sick this week, a guy that goes around from yard to yard that does packages came up sick. So there have been staff members now starting to pop up sick.

And of course, these staff members go to every building, regardless if you’re on quarantine or not. So the chances of it spreading again are pretty high. There’s a lot of us that still have never tested positive whether or not we’ve ever had it, we don’t know.

You know, in our current situation, of course, everybody’s scared. And the buildings, they’re starting to pack people back into here. So our population is upwards of 90 people.

And they’re starting to move people back into the buildings. So the closeness of our setting that we were in prior to the pandemic getting in here is being recreated, I have people all the way around me, right, left, within 42 inches of me. So there’s no ability to social distance, there’s no no ability whatsoever for them to do that.

We’re not provided hand sanitizer daily, we’re not given the ability to- to sanitize our bunk area in our living spaces, because we’re not given any of that type of stuff to be able to do that. We are given cloth masks. And honestly, pretty much, that’s it, you know. The ability to social distance is non existent, you have to do temperature checks twice a day, but they make us line up.

And of course, they tell you to crowd into a space that’s, you know, should only house maybe 10 people and there’s, you know, 60, 70 people crowded into a space to get your temperature check. So I feel like we’re on the verge of another surge coming through here again. We know we’re right there, we don’t know when it’s gonna happen.

There’s a lot of a lot of anxieties running high. We get threatened a lot. If you complain about this or that, like what I’m doing right now, that you’re going to get moved to an ad seg yard or get moved to B yard where I got stuck back over the summertime, which ended up causing me to end up in a suicidal situation. So it’s kind of it in a nutshell, our situation here.

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Chino. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Caller: Well, California Institution for Men (CIM) was one of the basically the starting points for COVID within the CDCR, the California prison system. It started, the cases started here back in early March of this year. The yard that I’m on currently (facility A), we didn’t start really seeing an impact until sometime in April, we had a building go on quarantine.

Basically, they didn’t handle anything, they just put the building on quarantine, we still mixed with the individuals. The buildings here, there’s eight on the yard. The buildings can house 160 inmates and a wide open dorm setting- bunks are about 42 inches apart, less in some situations, and they are double bunks.

There’s virtually no ventilation in the building, no air circulation. On April 30, they decided to drop the population in the in the buildings. And so they took approximately 30 inmates per building and just called a bunch of names.

I was one of the names at this time, that got removed from my building, and sent over to B yard, facility B, which is right next door and was a reception center. And basically thrown in a cell by myself. I suffer from epileptic seizures, which of course is a problem and I’ve had suicide attempt issues when I’m housed alone in previous situations.

So basically, they threw me in a cell by myself along with approximately 150 other people in cells by ourselves with wide open front doors. A week later, they decided to start COVID testing on facility A. My understanding was close to 100 inmates tested positive.

Facility B building I was in we had almost 40 inmates out of that initial test of those of us that were moved over, test positive, I had people all the way around me, above me, and to each side of me that tested positive and we were all still left in these cells. I did not test positive. I have not had a positive test thus far, and I just had my 14th test today, today.

So basically, what they were doing is like the folks that tested positive were there, they just put a sign on the door said isolation, and they left them locked in their cell for their 14-day isolation. They didn’t even get a chance to use a phone or take a shower.

So it made it very counterproductive for anybody that was having symptoms, which I did go through a period of time where I was having symptoms, but nobody wanted to report them because they were afraid of the situation they would be put in, cut off from their family, stuck in a cell alone for, you know, 24 hours a day, 14 straight days without even the ability to use a shower.

It was very, very cruel what they were doing to these folks, because the way I looked at it is you could end up dying and your family would never know that you were even sick. So it made it really counterintuitive for anybody they’re telling you “well report a symptom” but nobody wanted to because they were afraid of getting locked down in the situation they were.

I ended up lasting 30- approximately 30 days over there before I deteriorated mentally. And I ended up going to crisis bed on the first week in June on suicide watch, I’d actually gotten to the point where I’d actually created a plan, started writing suicide notes because I’ve never done well personally. A cell alone by myself locked down 24 hours a day.

And that’s exactly what it was, 24 hour day locked down in ad seg. You get- they were getting more programming than what we were getting. And we were just regular program inmates that had been classified and they got stuck over there with no program whatsoever.

I ended up stuck in crisis bed myself for over a month and a half because they didn’t know where they wanted to put me. The yard that I was on, A yard, the COVID cases were going crazy. And they didn’t know what to do with people.

So they were just moving people trying to create positive buildings and say “well half the building’s positive at the building’s not.” Problem is everybody shares a communal bathroom and there’s only one bathroom with, you know, six toilets or eight toilets and nine sinks. Everybody has to use the same bathroom.

So how do you put, you know, 75 negative people with 75 positive people and not expect the negative people not to get sick? Not gonna happen. And it just continued to grow.

And then they started shipping people out of this facility up to San Quentin and Avenal. And then of course, the explosion happened at San Quentin with cases from the people that they sent here. It was just nothing but a series of moving people around.

Trying whatever, like they just had no clue what they were doing. At this point, they’re not doing so much of the moving but we do have 14 tents sitting in the middle of our yard. On a couple of key- on one occasion, we had a Santa Ana windstorm and many of those tents blew away.

So they had to evacuate the people from those tents. And they got sent to another yard. Well they had to rebuild the tent city because the tents had actually literally blown away.

So right now, they test us every week. This side of the yard that I’m on, I’m on the west side, we get tested every Tuesday. The four buildings over here and the tent city get tested every Tuesday, so we were tested today.

We’ve all been on quarantine for the last few weeks. We’ve had a few cases- onesies twosies here and there. But for the most part, as of right now, it’s pretty quiet.

As far as cases go, we do have staff members that have started popping up sick, and two COs out in the tent city area within the last week came up sick. Supposedly our captain came up sick this week, a guy that goes around from yard to yard that does packages came up sick. So there have been staff members now starting to pop up sick.

And of course, these staff members go to every building, regardless if you’re on quarantine or not. So the chances of it spreading again are pretty high. There’s a lot of us that still have never tested positive whether or not we’ve ever had it, we don’t know.

You know, in our current situation, of course, everybody’s scared. And the buildings, they’re starting to pack people back into here. So our population is upwards of 90 people.

And they’re starting to move people back into the buildings. So the closeness of our setting that we were in prior to the pandemic getting in here is being recreated, I have people all the way around me, right, left, within 42 inches of me. So there’s no ability to social distance, there’s no no ability whatsoever for them to do that.

We’re not provided hand sanitizer daily, we’re not given the ability to- to sanitize our bunk area in our living spaces, because we’re not given any of that type of stuff to be able to do that. We are given cloth masks. And honestly, pretty much, that’s it, you know. The ability to social distance is non existent, you have to do temperature checks twice a day, but they make us line up.

And of course, they tell you to crowd into a space that’s, you know, should only house maybe 10 people and there’s, you know, 60, 70 people crowded into a space to get your temperature check. So I feel like we’re on the verge of another surge coming through here again. We know we’re right there, we don’t know when it’s gonna happen.

There’s a lot of a lot of anxieties running high. We get threatened a lot. If you complain about this or that, like what I’m doing right now, that you’re going to get moved to an ad seg yard or get moved to B yard where I got stuck back over the summertime, which ended up causing me to end up in a suicidal situation. So it’s kind of it in a nutshell, our situation here.

It’s, it’s a pretty scary situation for a lot of people. And of course, this yard is what they considered a high risk medical yard. So there was a lot of people here that that have already died.

Because you have a lot of people with a lot of underlying conditions, especially older folks, including myself, I’m, you know, I’m in my early 50s, but I have asthma, COPD, high blood pressure, you know, some of those different types of things that put me at high risk. And you know, and there’s been nothing being done to mitigate those types of circumstances.

And we have people in our, their 70s and 80s in here that have all of those and more that are much worse off than I am as far as underlying conditions, and they’re all- they’re all just shoved in these spots. There’s hardly anybody getting released from this facility to go home. I mean, it’s very rare you see somebody go home, which you know, was kind of unexpected, with all the releases they were talking about, doesn’t really seem to be happening here.

So the population seems to be staying pretty much the same at this point. I know they lost their ADA accreditation for this yard. So they’re going to be shipping a lot of the people in wheelchairs out because they can’t keep them here because they don’t have- this yard is not ADA compliant.

So I know there’s going to be some people leaving because of that. There’s a- I’m personally I’m a transgender inmate, so aside from dealing with the COVID situation, we’re still dealing with a lot of this stuff that relate to being trans as well. And and a lot of that being disregarded, especially treatment regarding trans individuals, medical treatment is being pushed to the backburner.

We don’t get any sort of regular treatment or the ability to see our doctor to have anything done or any adjustments made regarding the medically necessary treatment that we are supposed to have. I had to beg, beg them to finally even want to see me so I could get my mammogram done, which I’m way, way, way, way past due, you know those types of things. So yeah, I’m sorry.

It’s so hard to just- to do it justice without somebody being able to see it. Because if you could see a situation in which a lot of us are living- it’s scary. Everybody- I sit there every day and I wonder is today going to be the day that I get sick?

Because I worry, am I going to be the person that’s next? Am I the person that’s going to go out in an ambulance next? And am I ever going to see the people that I know and that I love again?

You just don’t know. Because there’s nothing being done because they don’t care. Even the staff members who are required to own certain PPE and wear masks- they’re not doing it. They’re not doing it.

So and then, yeah, it’s just really frustrating. And this environment, if you could see the inside of these buildings where we’re living, you’re like, it’s it’s no wonder that more of these people are not dead. It’s amazing to me, this facility should have been shut down. And yet, here we are and now they’re packing more people back into it.

08/20
Zero hours a day
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Zero hours a day

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino.

I have a great job on the yard, I get out of my cell for 7 til 3:30 p.m. But now one man was sick, now we are all lockdown. I went from eight hours to zero hours a day. I love to play handball but as of December 7, no more sports on the yards. I got COVID-19 in May. Now I lost my cellie on October 2. He got it. It’s not safe here. It’s not safe out there. We just have to pray for God to help us all. It is difficult but life is difficult.

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Galatians 5:13

God give me 24 hours a day. I give God one hour a day by reading my our daily bread and my bible letters in red.

Dear students,

Grace, peace, good health, and love be with all of you.

First of all, I am not a very good speaker with words. I too was a student at one time, Anaheim High Class of ’71. Now I am doing 50 years to life. I have been down 19 years on July 2, 2021.

I am a very lucky man. I have people who love me, but there are men and women and kids who have no one to help them with food, letters, visits, cards but most of all love. People need love and loved ones.

I have four brothers, three sisters, 12 grandkids I cannot see because of COVID-19 pandemic and a 92-year-young mother that has been there for me since day one.

I have a great job on the yard, I get out of my cell for 7 til 3:30 p.m. But now one man was sick, now we are all lockdown. I went from eight hours to zero hours a day. I love to play handball but as of December 7, no more sports on the yards. I got COVID-19 in May. Now I lost my cellie on October 2. He got it. It’s not safe here. It’s not safe out there. We just have to pray for God to help us all. It is difficult but life is difficult.

Just love one another, and tell your family everyday I love you so much. God bless you all. Stay positive test – your brother in Christ.

12/20
Arbitrary moves
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Arbitrary moves

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino.

The isolation issue has been frustrating. While every third bed was taken out of service, the wall-mounted 48” oscillating fans at each end of the dorm room during the warmer months would blow coughs and sneezes half way down the dorm, from either end. In addition to that, these buildings from the 40s house inmates who are taking ‘hot meds,’ which makes them sensitive to warmer temperatures.

The rooftop exhaust fan designed to remove the radiated heat from the dorm has been non-operational since February. We went through three record heat waves this past summer. When it’s 120 outside, it’s 115 in here. And with 75 bodies on each side, the heat lasts into the evening with no negative or positive pressure.

I’m certified since 1974 in commercial HVAC. When I sent a friendly informal letter to the AW of operations, who I spoke with previously, the letter was intercepted. I was called in front of the Captain who made it clear I should go through the chain of command for work orders, which a survey will reveal do not get generated.

When this ‘crisis’ first got underway, groups of five to 20 people would be called all of a sudden to move to another building, out to the tents, or to another yard. When this happens, a loss of acquired property takes place. Social interactions are broken up like musicians, educational mentors, craft projects, and of course the addicts and their suppliers. The stress of sudden movement, unnecessary loss of property, social reintegration in new areas creates cortisol in older people which diminishes the immune system, the very function the objective is to protect. A lot of arbitrary moves and money spending took place.

The company testing the swabs, Quest Labs, is known for false positives. My ‘bunkie’ and assistant for the repair shop was moved to the tents in March. Neither of us has displayed any symptoms. He gets air conditioning, I get 115 degrees.

Ironically, the heat med inmates remain in the building, outside of ASHRA 64 building codes. When the rooftop exhaust fan was fixed last December, the hot-shot worker put a motor in two to three times the RPM rating. When it started up, the pulley would squeal on the belt. The motor would overheat due to the torque mismatch, and shut down after 10 to 15 minutes to cool off. Then it would happen all over again, all night long, over the sleeping area. The excessive speed finally destroyed the turbine bearings and it locked up.

That was last April. Grainger industrial supply delivers in 48 hours. I’ve offered to help. No response. Now with the cool weather, the windows get closed. The farts and the coughs and spent air are there to greet us in the morning.

The full story

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Chino. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

I’m at the CDCR facility in Chino, level two, senior yard, and I understand you are interested in first-hand data during the C-virus modification of programs. I am 67, Air Force veteran in very good health since this started last year.

We live in long four upper/lower beds three to five feet apart on the sides. The outer rows of 10 to 12 beds have screened windows that open to the outside. Shortly after the pandemic, orders were sent down to take every third bed out of service, the logic of which doesn’t play out due to our proximity standing in lines for chow, utilizing the restroom/showers located midway between the 50 bed groups.

If you Google Earth 14901 S. Central Ave, Chino, our eight dorm layout can be seen with a ‘tent city’ of 12 eight-man tents in the center with portable AC/heating units, shower trailers and restrooms for those who tested positive in the last nine months, but mostly not showing any symptoms.

There are a few related topics I would like to include briefly. If additional information is desired, please send a note.

The isolation issue has been frustrating. While every third bed was taken out of service, the wall-mounted 48” oscillating fans at each end of the dorm room during the warmer months would blow coughs and sneezes half way down the dorm, from either end. In addition to that, these buildings from the 40s house inmates who are taking ‘hot meds,’ which makes them sensitive to warmer temperatures.

The rooftop exhaust fan designed to remove the radiated heat from the dorm has been non-operational since February. We went through three record heat waves this past summer. When it’s 120 outside, it’s 115 in here. And with 75 bodies on each side, the heat lasts into the evening with no negative or positive pressure.

I’m certified since 1974 in commercial HVAC. When I sent a friendly informal letter to the AW of operations, who I spoke with previously, the letter was intercepted. I was called in front of the Captain who made it clear I should go through the chain of command for work orders, which a survey will reveal do not get generated.

When this ‘crisis’ first got underway, groups of five to 20 people would be called all of a sudden to move to another building, out to the tents, or to another yard. When this happens, a loss of acquired property takes place. Social interactions are broken up like musicians, educational mentors, craft projects, and of course the addicts and their suppliers. The stress of sudden movement, unnecessary loss of property, social reintegration in new areas creates cortisol in older people which diminishes the immune system, the very function the objective is to protect. A lot of arbitrary moves and money spending took place.

The company testing the swabs, Quest Labs, is known for false positives. My ‘bunkie’ and assistant for the repair shop was moved to the tents in March. Neither of us has displayed any symptoms. He gets air conditioning, I get 115 degrees.

Ironically, the heat med inmates remain in the building, outside of ASHRA 64 building codes. When the rooftop exhaust fan was fixed last December, the hot-shot worker put a motor in two to three times the RPM rating. When it started up, the pulley would squeal on the belt. The motor would overheat due to the torque mismatch, and shut down after 10 to 15 minutes to cool off. Then it would happen all over again, all night long, over the sleeping area. The excessive speed finally destroyed the turbine bearings and it locked up.

That was last April. Grainger industrial supply delivers in 48 hours. I’ve offered to help. No response. Now with the cool weather, the windows get closed. The farts and the coughs and spent air are there to greet us in the morning.

I listen to science shows at night on the radio. I understand zinc, vitamin C and D help boost the immune system. It took me a couple months to get the cheap zinc from an outside vendor. Why was that never issued as a preventative?

The ultraviolet lamps that kill the C-virus in three minutes have all burned out, 24 of them, the last one in May. They also provide a soft night illumination for our older clientele trying to walk between the beds to the bathroom late at night.

This facility has a ‘mini-yard’ off of each dorm. A 50 x 1000 foot park-like setting with walking trails, a few benches, and tables to get outside for fresh air. We are fortunate to have that. The 90-day time credit was appreciated last June, and the extra vendor package.

I suggested the Zoom-style computer visits with family last July, and the system is just now getting installed for 30 minutes of screen time with family members. I developed a process awhile back where the experience could easily be in 3-D without the need for special glasses or screens. I gave a demo at the San Quentin TV production studio while there.

I want to scream at the idiocy of the state paying for addicts in the immediate vicinity who steal chemicals from the clinic, mix their own batch, and inject themselves and others in the neck, arm or leg three to four times a day at taxpayer expense, practicing medicine without a license, and destruction of state property themselves, or the inmate workers paid to make the prison wine to sell where neighbors throw up in my living area, start fights, or play their music loud. It gets worse in the name of rehabilitation.

When asked to lower the filth, a malicious confrontation takes place defining elder abuse. It takes eight taxpayers to support each one of these idiots, some getting paroled in a month or two to a neighborhood near you. With all of this in front of me, why must I wear a mask over my mouth when the C-virus enters through the eye ducts?

The insurance from the clinic of the illegally-used chemicals is far more damaging than minor respiratory distress. When I brought this up to mental health, I was told that’s the way things work here. Remove the word ‘rehabilitation’ from the agency title, who is receiving federal funds to manage this circus. I would love to teach HVAC, copy machine repair, or beginner’s electronics as I have in the past, but there’s no room for that nonsense.

Who do I see for lawful release from custody?

My father was a civil attorney. As a technician, I am trained to look for broken parts in a circuit. I received formal returns from various agencies, state and federal, on my trial that:

(1) The wiretaped evidence used in my trial is illegal, unauthorized, and voids the conviction.

(2) The absence of calendar dates on the counts voids my conviction. 6th United States constitutional amendment, notice and double jeopardy.

(3) The California Secretary of State returned that the prosecutor in Orange County case relied on actual fraud, manufactured evidence, and lacked probable cause. Trial void. I have all the above documents.

I presented all this to the Federal District Court. The respondent was summoned to appear and did not, four times. I was issued a discharge order. I filed for a writ of execution for release from custody. It was denied stating that because of my address, that it is assumed I owe restitution. I do not.

CDCR states zero balance owed on three appeals. Records staff here states it’s not their job, despite the Haygood v. Younger decision. If I sit and do nothing at this point, mid-2022 is my CDCR outdate. Holding a senior over 65 without authorization is a felony which I’ve proven with evidentiary backing.

The wiretap laws violated by the prosecutor award me $200 a day from 1993, plus attorney fees awarded to prosecute a claim, plus income lost from my active technical trades. Any counsel interested?

In closing, my engineer roommate and I, while researching the effects of different lighting frequencies and their influence on behavior modification, stumbled upon a chain reaction of events. Briefly, we had a seven color chart on our table late one night, reviewing the data. Tired, we shut off our overhead room light.

The orange security light from the next building shown across the chart and drastically changed the colors. Our interest peaked. We deciphered how this influence of a single frequency of night illumination would have on youth growing up under its influence night after night, on the street, in schools, in public parks.

We assembled a detailed report on our findings and it was subsequently published in two separate science research journals. It includes data from G.E. Lighting, and the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, and other reference footnotes.

We discovered the foundational cause for gangs and violence in our cities. After locals read the report, they tell me it makes too much sense. Then when you watch the news about officers or kids getting shot or attacked, the evidence is in plain sight.

I have developed a simple municipal cure for gang formation, territorial fights and killings, elder abuse, for application in cities as Los Angeles, Detroit, New York, or countries as Iraq and Iran. The report explains why.

With the absence of internet access, phone books, or outgoing calls without a pre-paid account, I can’t do anything about promoting this cure sitting here watching reruns of Green Acres. It’s very frustrating. CDCR is spending lots of money on isolating inmates, yet I can’t leave this mess with a federal discharge order, embossed and signed by a federal judge, in hand.

A neighbor I’m helping with a legal petition recently received valid confirmation that in fact his nephew raped his three pre-teen daughters while he was away at work, and the nephew threatened the three girls with great bodily injury if they told, to put the father out of the picture for continued access to them.

Well, six years later, after confiding in the family pastor about the miscarriages of justice, have produced signed declarations the father is, in fact, innocent of any wrong doing. The interrogation errors would take another page, his no contest plea was forced under duress clearly.

Staff here with a duty to act under Title 15, CCR, 3076, state it’s not their job. I have multiple types of petitions in the court of jurisdiction presently. How does he get away from this petri dish of coronavirus and back to his family? No tattoos, no drug or alcohol abuse, no priors, no harsh language, and a fine musician.

Thank you for your review of the above points. Sorry for the length. I’ve produced 18 screenplays and the words start to build up. I hope they made sense. Statements made above are sworn to be true and correct this 30th day November, 2020, at Chino, California, by the signature below. Further info on request, if needed. I just hope you get this. Take care.

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