Norco

CALIFORNIA REHABILITATION CENTER IS LOCATED IN NORCO, CA,
HOUSING 3,802 PEOPLE.

Since March 2020, there have been 1,993 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including 1 death, at this facility.

Stories from Norco

02/21
Purposefully spreading
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Purposefully spreading

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco.

So here at CRC there are four facilities here, A, B, C, D. Each facility has about 1,000 people in numerous dorms. As people caught COVID, they moved to dorm 410 on D facility. There the idea was move them to a designated dorm for 14 days, “quarantine.”

But once it filled up, they were moving people out after seven, eight days. That’s how our dorm caught it, they moved five people out of quarantine way before the 14 days, and one was contagious and our whole dorm got it. This prison continued moving people at random for several months. It really seemed like they were almost purposely spreading COVID all over the prison because there were numerous dorms that were COVID-free for months until they randomly moved inmates in and infected everyone.

So “if” it was not intentional, then it was extremely reckless and irresponsible at best. But then I find out they get $1,600 per inmate who catches COVID for what is suppose to be extra care. But that is the biggest out right bunch of B.S. EVER! They should be financially charged for theft!

For one, they do nothing for us (at all) different because we are sick. In fact I was sick in June, I have asthma and COPD. It took me going by ambulance unable to breath before I saw a doctor! And even then I was prescribed a different inhaler. I have have problems breathing since then and went back three more times because inhalers not working.

It’s now February, I have only seen a doctor that one time! The point is, $1,600 per inmate, 3,000 plus inmates. They made a lot of money from us suffering COVID.

Some people in here have caught COVID two and three times. But they put 32 tents on the yard to help relieve some of the overcrowding. Not only did COVID hit there, they also blew all over in the wind, flooded in the rain! It was deemed a failure, all removed.

The prison was given crazy amount of money for that, CDCR has made a ton of money from state funds, yet NOTHING has changed for us, except we have been locked down for a year. We have not seen any family in a year, no visits, and a lot of us, including myself, have lost relationships due to no visits. It is hard enough to have a relationship in here but take the only thing we really have to look forward to away (visiting) and it’s another strain, stress. It does create depression, anxiety, etc., etc.

The full story

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

I’m currently housed at California Rehabilitation Center, Norco, Cal. Don’t let the name fool you, there is “nothing” rehabilitative about this place! So I got 12 yrears for walking away from Delancey Street programs. I was detained to Delancey Street instead of state prison. I left Delancey Street for family reasons and was given 12 years state prison.

I asked to come to California Rehabilitation Center, “CRC,” to get help with my drug problem. I arrived in 2019. I asked at my initial review to be placed into whatever programs available to work on my addiction and help me help myself so I can get my life back on track!

For several months I sat around with nothing to do because this prison was so full it was approaching at 160%. Way overcrowded. People have been on waiting lists for two and three years just to get into any programs, which also means our living conditions are inhuman! We live in dorms that are actually falling apart.

The floors have holes big enough to put a football in. Our were originally designed for 35 inmates, we have 80 inmates now. Our beds are bunk beds that are 20, 36 inches apart. Four toilets, two urinals and a wall with six shower heads on it for 75, 80 people to share!

Then COVID hit our dorm. We had 78 people in here, three feet wide with 40 bunk beds lined up one side, two, three feet apart, walkway is about three feet wide, with 40 more beds on other side, a door in the center for bathroom/showers. You can’t go any place outside this which means there is no possibility of social distancing!

And because people were catching COVID, you’d think the prison would have followed Governor Newsom’s order in March and stopped all transfers and movement and kept all of us confined to our dorms in case one of us catch it from staff, it would not be spread all through the prison. However, this prison ignored all Governor’s orders and did whatever they wanted.

So here at CRC there are four facilities here, A, B, C, D. Each facility has about 1,000 people in numerous dorms. As people caught COVID, they moved to dorm 410 on D facility. There the idea was move them to a designated dorm for 14 days, “quarantine.”

But once it filled up, they were moving people out after seven, eight days. That’s how our dorm caught it, they moved five people out of quarantine way before the 14 days, and one was contagious and our whole dorm got it. This prison continued moving people at random for several months. It really seemed like they were almost purposely spreading COVID all over the prison because there were numerous dorms that were COVID-free for months until they randomly moved inmates in and infected everyone.

So “if” it was not intentional, then it was extremely reckless and irresponsible at best. But then I find out they get $1,600 per inmate who catches COVID for what is suppose to be extra care. But that is the biggest out right bunch of B.S. EVER! They should be financially charged for theft!

For one, they do nothing for us (at all) different because we are sick. In fact I was sick in June, I have asthma and COPD. It took me going by ambulance unable to breath before I saw a doctor! And even then I was prescribed a different inhaler. I have have problems breathing since then and went back three more times because inhalers not working.

It’s now February, I have only seen a doctor that one time! The point is, $1,600 per inmate, 3,000 plus inmates. They made a lot of money from us suffering COVID.

Some people in here have caught COVID two and three times. But they put 32 tents on the yard to help relieve some of the overcrowding. Not only did COVID hit there, they also blew all over in the wind, flooded in the rain! It was deemed a failure, all removed.

The prison was given crazy amount of money for that, CDCR has made a ton of money from state funds, yet NOTHING has changed for us, except we have been locked down for a year. We have not seen any family in a year, no visits, and a lot of us, including myself, have lost relationships due to no visits. It is hard enough to have a relationship in here but take the only thing we really have to look forward to away (visiting) and it’s another strain, stress. It does create depression, anxiety, etc., etc.

We are fed in our bed area. So the only place to eat is on your bed. There are two tables with four seats, etc. in dayroom, so we have no place to sit and eat, a lot to mention, six feet social distancing. So we do not go anyplace out of our dorm, no work, no nothing, yet CRC gets all this extra money for our care.

But nothing has changed at all, where does all that money go? I have filed a writ of habeas corpus on inhuman conditions, it dirty and way overcrowded. I understand we broke the law, and it’s not suppose to be a vacation. However, I left Delancey Street

I don’t feel my life should be jeopardized in this way, regardless of my crime, we all are supposed to have some rights. I had to file habeas corpus just so I can have a judge order them to have me checked out by a specialist because after COVID, I have been having difficulty breathing.

And we’re also asking the judge to order a 50% reduction in our population so that we are not living in a “super spreader” environment. For whatever reason, CDCR just refuses to use Prop 57 for what it was intended for and let some of these guys out who qualify. Because CDCR keep denying people saying that they don’t have enough rehabilitation programs in!

However, like myself, I have been on a waiting list that is a couple years long due to overcrowding, so they have no way of doing any programs and now we are locked down. It’s sad, but it’s all about money, they get money for everybody in here, allowing people released and they lose their cash cow!

The problem is I have no voice to let the public know what’s really going on! There is so much more I could tell you if you’re interested. I also have a lot of documents to actually prove what I claim.

One last thing, my lawyer who’s doing my habeas, he said on CDCR’s website that out of every 1,000 people tested here, 95.5% have tested positive for COVID, 5% of population has “a lot” been infected. Since then it went from 95.5% to 115%, that’s because some have been infected multiple times. But it truly seems nobody really cares.

So far about 150 inmates here in California state prisons have died. Not counting federal prisons or county jails, just the 35 California prisons! Most unnecessarily, sad.

02/21
Impossible to distance
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Impossible to distance

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Norco.

Caller: So okay, so I personally tested positive back in September.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And one of the big things that they’re telling us to do is social distance and it’s impossible to do. I mean I’m in a, just so you know, I’m in a- this is a dorm setting, this is not cells. So this a dorm setting and as a matter of fact, my dorm right now is on quarantine.

We’ve had, in the last two weeks, we’ve had probably about 25-30 people test positive. And like I said, one of my friends who tested positive I think in August, tested positive again on Monday.

They have started in my dorm, they’ve given about maybe 10 people the vaccine, the first shot. But a couple of those people have tested positive since then. You know and it’s just, it’s- for a lot of us, it’s just really scary cause I mean well like I’m saying one of the main things we’re being told to do is social distance and I mean it’s all over the news but we can’t- it’s impossible to do that.

And you know me, personally, I like I said I tested positive back in September, and you know God with all these new variants, I definitely don’t wanna, I’m praying I don’t test positive again. And I’m eerie from all the health experts is that we can have long-term effects. I mean like I had symp- I was sick, really sick for two days.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And I had symptoms. I felt bad a little bit after that, but I was really really sick for two days.

The full story

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Norco. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Caller: Oh gosh a lot going on now. We have people who are testing twice, who tested positive twice with coronavirus. So okay, so I personally tested positive back in September.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And one of the big things that they’re telling us to do is social distance and it’s impossible to do. I mean I’m in a, just so you know, I’m in a- this is a dorm setting, this is not cells. So this a dorm setting and as a matter of fact, my dorm right now is on quarantine.

We’ve had, in the last two weeks, we’ve had probably about 25-30 people test positive. And like I said, one of my friends who tested positive I think in August, tested positive again on Monday.

They have started in my dorm, they’ve given about maybe 10 people the vaccine, the first shot. But a couple of those people have tested positive since then. You know and it’s just, it’s- for a lot of us, it’s just really scary cause I mean well like I’m saying one of the main things we’re being told to do is social distance and I mean it’s all over the news but we can’t- it’s impossible to do that.

And you know me, personally, I like I said I tested positive back in September, and you know God with all these new variants, I definitely don’t wanna, I’m praying I don’t test positive again. And I’m eerie from all the health experts is that we can have long-term effects. I mean like I had symp- I was sick, really sick for two days.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And I had symptoms. I felt bad a little bit after that, but I was really really sick for two days. And after that I kind of bounced back. But what I’m hearing now is that even if you bounced back, I mean you don’t have to, you don’t have to have serious, you don’t have symptoms and go to the hospital.

Just contracting the virus, you can have long-term side effects years down the road, you know, with your heart, your lungs, respiratory problems. And so that’s, you know, that’s my concern, you know?

UCI: If possible, could you tell me about how your facility is handling the outbreak?

Caller: Okay yeah so, they do pass out, they do pass out masks now every couple weeks. But the problem with that is, for example, the last- matter of fact we should be getting masks tonight. But two weeks ago when we received masks, the officer who brought them to us, he handed them out and he didn’t have on gloves.

UCI: Mmm.

Caller: He just brought them over, I don’t know where he came from, but he handed them to the officer in my building and neither one of them had gloves. And so we were, you know, now so now we’re using masks that are possibly contaminated already from the jump, you know. And right after that, that’s when we had another outbreak.

You know so, we all we do get temperature checks now just about every day. We get tested now. We get tested and actually testing us every- so they tested us on Friday and we tested again yesterday on Tuesday.

Since the outbreak, we’ve been testing like twice a week. I was told after I contracted the virus, to the dorm I’m in now, is that the recovery dorm and it’s not a recovery dorm. And so, gosh, you know, honestly, they’re just really shuffling us around.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And um that’s really what they’re doing. And, so you know, there’s a lot of concern here. You know there’s a lot of fear, but you just got to be strong. I’m struggling. I’m actually in the mental health program too.

I was diagnosed with depression and PTSD. So, you know, honestly, I’m doing okay. I’ve had my ups and- one of the things that really helps me is my faith, you know, I am a Christian. And so that helps me, you know.

And I’m just trying to stay positive and surround myself with other guys who are positive and then I also I’m doing my part, you know. I do what’s being asked to. I wear my mask, I wash my hands, I try at my desk when I can to social distance.

So, I’m doing okay as far as that. But, you know, there’s, you know, to be honest with you there’s a lot of people who are really, really concerned now that people are testing positive after they’ve gotten their, the vaccine.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And now people are testing positive twice. And we’re hearing on the news with all the new variants out in South Africa, Brazil, and the UK. So guys, guys, we’re not sure, you know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: Keep in mind, one thing very important, we’re inmates and so we’re like for a lot of people as far as their concern, we’re at the, you know, we’re at the bottom of the barrel. And a lot of people really just don’t care. Well they’re inmates, who cares, you know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And that’s how staff see us also, not all. If I’m being honest, not all staff. But there are some say like, “Oh well, they’re just inmates.”

And so there are a lot of people who prefer, especially some of the older guys who have underlying conditions, you know, to be just to be frank. There are guys who really talk a lot, “Well man. Am I gonna even make it home to my family?” You know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And, well it’s a real concern. I just recently had my first grandson. My daughter had my first grandson six months ago.

And I, you know, it’s something that I think about, you know. I consider it. My friend who just, who tested positive a couple days ago, they moved him to another part of the prison and so I’m really, I would love to hear from him just to see how he’s doing.

I don’t, you know, we don’t know so, cause after you test positive here, they move you out of here to another place. And so we don’t, you know, we don’t know what’s going on with those other guys so, you know. I honestly don’t know. I’m just doing the best I can, you know.

Just so you know, we have free phone calls today. We’ve been getting them twice a month now, because of the corona, we’re not able to get visits so that we get free phone calls twice a month.

02/21
Doing my part
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Doing my part

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Norco.

Caller: And, so you know, there’s a lot of concern here. You know there’s a lot of fear, but you just got to be strong. I’m struggling. I’m actually in the mental health program too.

I was diagnosed with depression and PTSD. So, you know, honestly, I’m doing okay. I’ve had my ups and- one of the things that really helps me is my faith, you know, I am a Christian. And so that helps me, you know.

And I’m just trying to stay positive and surround myself with other guys who are positive and then I also I’m doing my part, you know. I do what’s being asked to. I wear my mask, I wash my hands, I try at my desk when I can to social distance.

So, I’m doing okay as far as that.

The full story

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This story was told by a person incarcerated at Norco. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Caller: Oh gosh a lot going on now. We have people who are testing twice, who tested positive twice with coronavirus. So okay, so I personally tested positive back in September.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And one of the big things that they’re telling us to do is social distance and it’s impossible to do. I mean I’m in a, just so you know, I’m in a- this is a dorm setting, this is not cells. So this a dorm setting and as a matter of fact, my dorm right now is on quarantine.

We’ve had, in the last two weeks, we’ve had probably about 25-30 people test positive. And like I said, one of my friends who tested positive I think in August, tested positive again on Monday.

They have started in my dorm, they’ve given about maybe 10 people the vaccine, the first shot. But a couple of those people have tested positive since then. You know and it’s just, it’s- for a lot of us, it’s just really scary cause I mean well like I’m saying one of the main things we’re being told to do is social distance and I mean it’s all over the news but we can’t- it’s impossible to do that.

And you know me, personally, I like I said I tested positive back in September, and you know God with all these new variants, I definitely don’t wanna, I’m praying I don’t test positive again. And I’m eerie from all the health experts is that we can have long-term effects. I mean like I had symp- I was sick, really sick for two days.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And I had symptoms. I felt bad a little bit after that, but I was really really sick for two days. And after that I kind of bounced back. But what I’m hearing now is that even if you bounced back, I mean you don’t have to, you don’t have to have serious, you don’t have symptoms and go to the hospital.

Just contracting the virus, you can have long-term side effects years down the road, you know, with your heart, your lungs, respiratory problems. And so that’s, you know, that’s my concern, you know?

UCI: If possible, could you tell me about how your facility is handling the outbreak?

Caller: Okay yeah so, they do pass out, they do pass out masks now every couple weeks. But the problem with that is, for example, the last- matter of fact we should be getting masks tonight. But two weeks ago when we received masks, the officer who brought them to us, he handed them out and he didn’t have on gloves.

UCI: Mmm.

Caller: He just brought them over, I don’t know where he came from, but he handed them to the officer in my building and neither one of them had gloves. And so we were, you know, now so now we’re using masks that are possibly contaminated already from the jump, you know. And right after that, that’s when we had another outbreak.

You know so, we all we do get temperature checks now just about every day. We get tested now. We get tested and actually testing us every- so they tested us on Friday and we tested again yesterday on Tuesday.

Since the outbreak, we’ve been testing like twice a week. I was told after I contracted the virus, to the dorm I’m in now, is that the recovery dorm and it’s not a recovery dorm. And so, gosh, you know, honestly, they’re just really shuffling us around.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And um that’s really what they’re doing. And, so you know, there’s a lot of concern here. You know there’s a lot of fear, but you just got to be strong. I’m struggling. I’m actually in the mental health program too.

I was diagnosed with depression and PTSD. So, you know, honestly, I’m doing okay. I’ve had my ups and- one of the things that really helps me is my faith, you know, I am a Christian. And so that helps me, you know.

And I’m just trying to stay positive and surround myself with other guys who are positive and then I also I’m doing my part, you know. I do what’s being asked to. I wear my mask, I wash my hands, I try at my desk when I can to social distance.

So, I’m doing okay as far as that. But, you know, there’s, you know, to be honest with you there’s a lot of people who are really, really concerned now that people are testing positive after they’ve gotten their, the vaccine.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And now people are testing positive twice. And we’re hearing on the news with all the new variants out in South Africa, Brazil, and the UK. So guys, guys, we’re not sure, you know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: Keep in mind, one thing very important, we’re inmates and so we’re like for a lot of people as far as their concern, we’re at the, you know, we’re at the bottom of the barrel. And a lot of people really just don’t care. Well they’re inmates, who cares, you know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And that’s how staff see us also, not all. If I’m being honest, not all staff. But there are some say like, “Oh well, they’re just inmates.”

And so there are a lot of people who prefer, especially some of the older guys who have underlying conditions, you know, to be just to be frank. There are guys who really talk a lot, “Well man. Am I gonna even make it home to my family?” You know.

UCI: Mhm.

Caller: And, well it’s a real concern. I just recently had my first grandson. My daughter had my first grandson six months ago.

And I, you know, it’s something that I think about, you know. I consider it. My friend who just, who tested positive a couple days ago, they moved him to another part of the prison and so I’m really, I would love to hear from him just to see how he’s doing.

I don’t, you know, we don’t know so, cause after you test positive here, they move you out of here to another place. And so we don’t, you know, we don’t know what’s going on with those other guys so, you know. I honestly don’t know. I’m just doing the best I can, you know.

Just so you know, we have free phone calls today. We’ve been getting them twice a month now, because of the corona, we’re not able to get visits so that we get free phone calls twice a month.

01/21
Kept their distance
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Kept their distance

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco.

Then they turned a building next to ours into a COVID isolation dorm, where inmates are housed for 14 days and moved back to the main population. They moved two inmates from the isolation dorm to ours, which had been COVID free. At first, everyone kept their distance from them, even though they recovered from COVID.

One person started hanging out with them by drinking and eating. After awhile, he was the first one from our dorm to have COVID. It’s all dorm living. So we all tested next. A few people have and there would be moved due to COVID detection. Two days later they called 20-something bunks, about 30-something people, many of whom I’ve dealt with on a daily basis, even from my bunk.

Within a few weeks the dorm went from about 80 to 26. It’s stressful being extra clean and careful to wipe down the phone, using a towel to touch surfaces used by others. Family struggling with loss of work and a family member getting sick.

I’m at medical risk with heart disease so I submitted papers for early release. And it wasn’t granted because I am a violent offender. With only 25 of us left in the dorm, we were moved to another to make room. Our dorm was to be turned into a COVID recovery dorm of 100 inmates. The outbreak was very bad at the time touching every part of the prison.

The new dorm was filled with people who had recovered or never been sick with COVID. For about two months, no sickness. Then a correction officer came to work and got most of the dorm sick. This time I wasn’t so lucky. At night, I was woken up by my own coughing and heard plenty more coughing from others. I tested in December. COVID was not detected. I knew I was sick, headache, running nose, body sore. They moved about 20 to the COVID isolation dorm.

The full story

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

Thank you PrisonPandemic for reaching out. Many of us have stories to tell about how we are coping with COVID-19 while incarcerated.

March of 2020, while in HVAC class, the instructor told us that the Governor put all prisons statewide on a modified lockdown. Due to COVID-19 some highly contagious virus in China. All of us figured we was safe behind the wall, away from society. Which was true for about two months, until we heard about an outbreak in another area of the prison.

Then they turned a building next to ours into a COVID isolation dorm, where inmates are housed for 14 days and moved back to the main population. They moved two inmates from the isolation dorm to ours, which had been COVID free. At first, everyone kept their distance from them, even though they recovered from COVID.

One person started hanging out with them by drinking and eating. After awhile, he was the first one from our dorm to have COVID. It’s all dorm living. So we all tested next. A few people have and there would be moved due to COVID detection. Two days later they called 20-something bunks, about 30-something people, many of whom I’ve dealt with on a daily basis, even from my bunk.

Within a few weeks the dorm went from about 80 to 26. It’s stressful being extra clean and careful to wipe down the phone, using a towel to touch surfaces used by others. Family struggling with loss of work and a family member getting sick.

I’m at medical risk with heart disease so I submitted papers for early release. And it wasn’t granted because I am a violent offender. With only 25 of us left in the dorm, we were moved to another to make room. Our dorm was to be turned into a COVID recovery dorm of 100 inmates. The outbreak was very bad at the time touching every part of the prison.

The new dorm was filled with people who had recovered or never been sick with COVID. For about two months, no sickness. Then a correction officer came to work and got most of the dorm sick. This time I wasn’t so lucky. At night, I was woken up by my own coughing and heard plenty more coughing from others. I tested in December. COVID was not detected. I knew I was sick, headache, running nose, body sore. They moved about 20 to the COVID isolation dorm.

We tested again. I was moved to the COVID isolation dorm because COVID-19 was detected in my body.

This dorm was being used for months to isolate the infected inmates but had been closed for a few weeks due to the cases dropping. Once there, it was dirty and cold. During my time there, there would be no heat and correction officers would leave the door open at 10:00 and 5:30 during shift change, with the wind blasting us in first row of bunks!

One of us would had to get up and close the door. Almost forgot, had to take a lot of cold showers. It seems symptoms worsen. No laundry exchange. Twice a day nurses came and checked our vitals and would make sure we got cough drops or aspirin.

Eventually, I was happy to be away from the building of sickness. Once we got to the new dorm, a correction officer that was working in the COVID positive dorm was doing overtime there. Next day he tested positive and the weeks following it has hit this everyday. People are being taken out and the saga continues.

Thank you and God bless.

02/21
Way overcrowded
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Way overcrowded

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco.

We are fed in our bed area. So the only place to eat is on your bed. There are two tables with four seats, etc. in dayroom, so we have no place to sit and eat, a lot to mention, six feet social distancing. So we do not go anyplace out of our dorm, no work, no nothing, yet CRC gets all this extra money for our care.

But nothing has changed at all, where does all that money go? I have filed a writ of habeas corpus on inhuman conditions, it dirty and way overcrowded. I understand we broke the law, and it’s not suppose to be a vacation. However, I left Delancey Street

I don’t feel my life should be jeopardized in this way, regardless of my crime, we all are supposed to have some rights. I had to file habeas corpus just so I can have a judge order them to have me checked out by a specialist because after COVID, I have been having difficulty breathing.

And we’re also asking the judge to order a 50% reduction in our population so that we are not living in a “super spreader” environment. For whatever reason, CDCR just refuses to use Prop 57 for what it was intended for and let some of these guys out who qualify. Because CDCR keep denying people saying that they don’t have enough rehabilitation programs in!

However, like myself, I have been on a waiting list that is a couple years long due to overcrowding, so they have no way of doing any programs and now we are locked down. It’s sad, but it’s all about money, they get money for everybody in here, allowing people released and they lose their cash cow!

The problem is I have no voice to let the public know what’s really going on! There is so much more I could tell you if you’re interested. I also have a lot of documents to actually prove what I claim.

One last thing, my lawyer who’s doing my habeas, he said on CDCR’s website that out of every 1,000 people tested here, 95.5% have tested positive for COVID, 5% of population has “a lot” been infected. Since then it went from 95.5% to 115%, that’s because some have been infected multiple times. But it truly seems nobody really cares.

So far about 150 inmates here in California state prisons have died. Not counting federal prisons or county jails, just the 35 California prisons! Most unnecessarily, sad.

The full story

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This letter was written by a person incarcerated at Norco. Click the play button again to hear their full story.

I’m currently housed at California Rehabilitation Center, Norco, Cal. Don’t let the name fool you, there is “nothing” rehabilitative about this place! So I got 12 yrears for walking away from Delancey Street programs. I was detained to Delancey Street instead of state prison. I left Delancey Street for family reasons and was given 12 years state prison.

I asked to come to California Rehabilitation Center, “CRC,” to get help with my drug problem. I arrived in 2019. I asked at my initial review to be placed into whatever programs available to work on my addiction and help me help myself so I can get my life back on track!

For several months I sat around with nothing to do because this prison was so full it was approaching at 160%. Way overcrowded. People have been on waiting lists for two and three years just to get into any programs, which also means our living conditions are inhuman! We live in dorms that are actually falling apart.

The floors have holes big enough to put a football in. Our were originally designed for 35 inmates, we have 80 inmates now. Our beds are bunk beds that are 20, 36 inches apart. Four toilets, two urinals and a wall with six shower heads on it for 75, 80 people to share!

Then COVID hit our dorm. We had 78 people in here, three feet wide with 40 bunk beds lined up one side, two, three feet apart, walkway is about three feet wide, with 40 more beds on other side, a door in the center for bathroom/showers. You can’t go any place outside this which means there is no possibility of social distancing!

And because people were catching COVID, you’d think the prison would have followed Governor Newsom’s order in March and stopped all transfers and movement and kept all of us confined to our dorms in case one of us catch it from staff, it would not be spread all through the prison. However, this prison ignored all Governor’s orders and did whatever they wanted.

So here at CRC there are four facilities here, A, B, C, D. Each facility has about 1,000 people in numerous dorms. As people caught COVID, they moved to dorm 410 on D facility. There the idea was move them to a designated dorm for 14 days, “quarantine.”

But once it filled up, they were moving people out after seven, eight days. That’s how our dorm caught it, they moved five people out of quarantine way before the 14 days, and one was contagious and our whole dorm got it. This prison continued moving people at random for several months. It really seemed like they were almost purposely spreading COVID all over the prison because there were numerous dorms that were COVID-free for months until they randomly moved inmates in and infected everyone.

So “if” it was not intentional, then it was extremely reckless and irresponsible at best. But then I find out they get $1,600 per inmate who catches COVID for what is suppose to be extra care. But that is the biggest out right bunch of B.S. EVER! They should be financially charged for theft!

For one, they do nothing for us (at all) different because we are sick. In fact I was sick in June, I have asthma and COPD. It took me going by ambulance unable to breath before I saw a doctor! And even then I was prescribed a different inhaler. I have have problems breathing since then and went back three more times because inhalers not working.

It’s now February, I have only seen a doctor that one time! The point is, $1,600 per inmate, 3,000 plus inmates. They made a lot of money from us suffering COVID.

Some people in here have caught COVID two and three times. But they put 32 tents on the yard to help relieve some of the overcrowding. Not only did COVID hit there, they also blew all over in the wind, flooded in the rain! It was deemed a failure, all removed.

The prison was given crazy amount of money for that, CDCR has made a ton of money from state funds, yet NOTHING has changed for us, except we have been locked down for a year. We have not seen any family in a year, no visits, and a lot of us, including myself, have lost relationships due to no visits. It is hard enough to have a relationship in here but take the only thing we really have to look forward to away (visiting) and it’s another strain, stress. It does create depression, anxiety, etc., etc.

We are fed in our bed area. So the only place to eat is on your bed. There are two tables with four seats, etc. in dayroom, so we have no place to sit and eat, a lot to mention, six feet social distancing. So we do not go anyplace out of our dorm, no work, no nothing, yet CRC gets all this extra money for our care.

But nothing has changed at all, where does all that money go? I have filed a writ of habeas corpus on inhuman conditions, it dirty and way overcrowded. I understand we broke the law, and it’s not suppose to be a vacation. However, I left Delancey Street

I don’t feel my life should be jeopardized in this way, regardless of my crime, we all are supposed to have some rights. I had to file habeas corpus just so I can have a judge order them to have me checked out by a specialist because after COVID, I have been having difficulty breathing.

And we’re also asking the judge to order a 50% reduction in our population so that we are not living in a “super spreader” environment. For whatever reason, CDCR just refuses to use Prop 57 for what it was intended for and let some of these guys out who qualify. Because CDCR keep denying people saying that they don’t have enough rehabilitation programs in!

However, like myself, I have been on a waiting list that is a couple years long due to overcrowding, so they have no way of doing any programs and now we are locked down. It’s sad, but it’s all about money, they get money for everybody in here, allowing people released and they lose their cash cow!

The problem is I have no voice to let the public know what’s really going on! There is so much more I could tell you if you’re interested. I also have a lot of documents to actually prove what I claim.

One last thing, my lawyer who’s doing my habeas, he said on CDCR’s website that out of every 1,000 people tested here, 95.5% have tested positive for COVID, 5% of population has “a lot” been infected. Since then it went from 95.5% to 115%, that’s because some have been infected multiple times. But it truly seems nobody really cares.

So far about 150 inmates here in California state prisons have died. Not counting federal prisons or county jails, just the 35 California prisons! Most unnecessarily, sad.

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